Home > Publications > Genome editing: the road of CRISPR/Cas9 from bench to clinic
Publications

Genome editing: the road of CRISPR/Cas9 from bench to clinic

Bibliography:

Ayman Eid and Magdy M. Mahfouz. Genome editing: the road of CRISPR/Cas9 from bench to clinic. Experimental & Molecular Medicine. doi:10.1038/emm.2016.111

Authors:

Ayman Eid and Magdy M. Mahfouz

Keywords:

N/A

Year:

2016

Abstract:

​Molecular scissors engineered for site-specific modification of the genome hold great promise for effective functional analyses of genes, genomes and epigenomes and could improve our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of disease states and facilitate novel therapeutic applications. Several platforms for molecular scissors that enable targeted genome engineering have been developed, including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and, most recently, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated-9 (Cas9). The CRISPR/Cas9 system's simplicity, facile engineering and amenability to multiplexing make it the system of choice for many applications. CRISPR/Cas9 has been used to generate disease models to study genetic diseases. Improvements are urgently needed for various aspects of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, including the system's precision, delivery and control over the outcome of the repair process. Here, we discuss the current status of genome engineering and its implications for the future of biological research and gene therapy.

ISSN:

1226-3613